Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has stirred up a ton of controversy, with overwhelming evidence, including a 2017 study released by a World Health Organization (WHO) monitoring centre in Sweden, revealing that the vaccine can produce clusters of serious adverse events that include complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) more so than any other vaccine.

With the CDC reporting that an estimated 79 million Americans are currently infected with HPV, and about 14 million people become newly infected each year, it’s clear measures need to be taken, but the current vaccination is not the answer.

While more stories have surfaced in recent years revealing the vaccine injuries resulting from the HPV vaccine, they still largely go underreported, and are difficult to diagnose. Dysautonomic syndrome — a condition in which the autonomic nervous system does not work properly, and involves a group of diseases including orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, multiple system atrophy, autonomic failure, and autonomic neuropathy — is just one of the reported downfalls of the HPV vaccine.

new study published in the Israel Medical Association Journal may be of help, however.

The study, which looked to observe the short-term effect of cannabinoid-enriched hemp oil for relieving symptoms and improving the life quality in young girls with adverse drug effects following human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, found the CBD-rich hemp oil to be a promising treatment.

The researchers used the CBD-enriched hemp oil over a three-month period. The participants consisted of a group of 12 females between the ages of 12 and 24, all suffering from severe somatoform and dysautonomic syndrome following HPV vaccination. They were given sublingual CBD-rich hemp oil drops, 25 mg/kg per day, supplemented by 2-5 mg/ml CBD once a week until a maximum dose of 150 mg/ml CBD per day was reached over the three-month period.

The results were promising, according to the study authors, who said their study “demonstrated the safety and tolerability of CBD-rich hemp oil and the primary efficacy endpoint. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to characterize the safety profile and efficacy of this compound.”

And while it’s certainly important to discuss how medicine that has been used for thousands of years, like cannabis, for treating various ailments — only to be scrutinized by the government and Big Pharma — can benefit people suffering from immense emotional, mental, and physical pain, it’s also important to point out that the culprit here is still the vaccine.

Health authorities and professionals must make parents, caretakers, and children completely aware of the known risks, and it should not only be a moral necessity, but a legal one as well. The more awareness is out there, the more people may come forward about health issues they have, which could then be linked to the vaccine, and in turn, spur further reporting on the issue to make the controversy an accepted reality, and not something Big Pharma merely mocks. Furthermore, its imperative that people are educated on ways to minimise the risk of HPV transmission altogether.

More On The HPV Vaccine

Of all the women who get an HPV infection, approximately 70 percent of those will clear that infection all by themselves in the first year. You don’t even have to detect it or treat it. Within two years, approximately 90 percent of those women will clear it all by themselves. By three years, you will have 10 percent of that original group of women left who still have an HPV infection, and 5 percent of this 10 percent will have progressed into a pre-cancerous lesion. So, “now you have that small group of women who have pre-cancerous lesions and now let’s look at that moving into invasive carcinoma. What we know then is that amongst women with. . . [pre-cancerous] lesions. . . it takes five years for about twenty percent of them to become invasive carcinomas. That’s a pretty slow process. It takes about thirty years for forty percent of them to become invasive cervical carcinomas.” (source)

This begs the question, why do nine-year old girls need vaccinations for symptomless venereal diseases that their immune systems kill anyway?

Dr. Dianne Harper is one of a select few specialists in OB/GYN (in the world) who helped design and carry out the Phase II and Phase III safety and effectiveness studies to get Gardasil approved. There are only 50 HPV experts in the world, and Dr. Harper is one of them, inarguably making her an expert on the subject.

Since Harper’s involvement in getting Gardasil approved, she has condemned the vaccine, stating that it is neither safe nor effective. She has mentioned that the tested length of the efficacy of the vaccines in preventing HPV infection is not long enough to prevent cervical cancer, which, as she states, can take decades to develop. She has also stated that vaccination will not decrease the number of cervical cancer cases, but a routine of regular pap smears will.

Harper has told CBS that these vaccines are essentially useless, explaining that “the benefit to public health is nothing, there is no reduction in cervical cancers, they are just postponed, unless the protection lasts for at least 15 years, and over 70% of all sexually active females of all ages are vaccinated.”

She also goes on to caution of their dangers:

“Parents and women must know that deaths occurred. Not all deaths that have been reported were represented in Dr. Slade’s work, one-third of the death reports were unavailable to the CDC, leaving the parents of the deceased teenagers in despair that the CDC is ignoring the very rare but real occurrences that need not have happened if parents were given information stating that there are real, but small risks of death surrounding the administration of Gardasil.”

“It is a vaccine that’s been highly marketed, the benefits are over-hyped, and the dangers are underestimated.” – Dr. Chris Shaw, Professor at the University of British Columbia, in the department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Visual Sciences (Taken from the One More Girl documentary)

When one looks at the independent literature, so studies which are not sponsored by the vaccine manufacturers, so with relation to Gardasil there have been several reports documenting multiple sclerosis and encephalitis, which is brain inflammation, in girls who have received their Gardasil vaccine. So just because a study sponsored by the manufacturers does not identify problems with the vaccine does not necessarily mean that the vaccine is safe. In fact if one looks at the manufacturer studies, they’re often not designed to detect serious adverse events. There was a study done by a group of researchers sponsored by Glaxo Smith and Kline and they were looking at Cervarix, which is another HPV vaccine, and the authors acknowledged that none of the studies that they evaluated have been designed to detect autoimmune diseases. So obviously, you’re not going to find what you’re not looking for. And in spite of these obvious flaws, they concluded that there is no evidence that Cervarix is associated with increased risk for autoimmune diseases, and this is absurd because you haven’t looked for it, the study has not been designed to detect autoimmune diseases.”

– Dr. Lucija Tomljenovic, PhD, Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia, where she works in Neurosciences and the Department of Medicine (source)

A brand new study recently published in the journal Pediatrics has found that many paediatricians don’t strongly recommend the HPV vaccine. For those of you who are unaware, the HPV vaccine, also known as the Gardasil vaccine, is designed to protect against four types of human papillomavirus, or HPV.  Although the HPV vaccine is banned in multiple countries, like Japan for example, it has been approved for use in Canada and approximately 100 other countries.

Researchers used a national survey asking approximately 600 doctors to outline their stance on the HPV vaccine. Conducted between October 2013 and January 2014, the study found that a large percentage of paediatricians and family doctors — nearly one third of those surveyed — are not strongly recommending the HPV vaccine to parents and preteens, which is why, as illustrated by the study, HPV vaccination rates continue to drop.

The study mentioned that some doctors felt the need for a clearer understanding of reasons to vaccinate preteens, particularly given the fact that most do not become sexually active until later on in life, and that many parents would object to them assuming otherwise.

Prior to this, another study was published in the journal Cancer Epidemiolog in 2015Written by Melissa B. Gilkey, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, the study was designed to assess how physicians recommend the HPV vaccine. The authors were surprised to find that “physicians so often reported recommending HPV vaccination inconsistently, behind schedule, or without urgency. Of the five communication practices we assessed, about half of physicians reported two or more practices that likely discourage timely HPV vaccination.” (source)

This study found that 27 percent of physicians across the United States do not strongly endorse HPV vaccination, and 39 percent reported that they do not give the vaccinations on time as recommended. Approximately 59 percent of physicians recommended it for adolescents.

1 COMMENT

  1. This is informative. I have been debating over my friends to opt out receiving HPV vaccines. This is something I could add up to my debate list. 🙂 and I will be sourcing from here on my new article post.

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